Peahens can differentiate between the antipredator calls of individual conspecifics

Nichols, M.R. & Yorzinski, J.L. 2016. Peahens can differentiate between the antipredator calls of individual conspecifics. Animal Behaviour 112: 23-27.

Peafowl antipredator calls encode information about signalers

Yorzinski, J.L. 2014. Peafowl antipredator calls encode information about signalers. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 135: 942-952.

Peafowl at night

Nocturnal Antipredator Behavior in Peafowl

Although nocturnal predation is a major cause of animal mortality, antipredator behavior at night is poorly understood. To investigate how diurnal animals adjust their antipredator behavior during these different conditions, we exposed peahens to a taxidermy raccoon during the daytime and nighttime. During the day, the peahens emitted loud antipredator calls, extended their necks upward, adopted a preflight posture, and approached the predator; at night, the peahens emitted soft hissing calls, remained stationary, piloerected their feathers, and raised their tails. The results demonstrate that birds adopt radically different antipredator behavior depending on whether the threat occurs in the daytime or nighttime. Videos showing nocturnal and diurnal antipredator behavior of peafowl (Pavo cristatus) are available online.

The difference between night and day: antipredator behavior in birds

Yorzinski, J.L. & Platt, M.L. 2012. The difference between night and day: antipredator behavior in birds. Journal of Ethology 30: 211-218.

field sensors

Acoustic Directionality in Songbirds

Animals in many vertebrate species vocalize in response to predators, but it is often unclear whether these antipredator calls function to communicate with predators, conspecifics or both. We evaluated the function of antipredator calls in songbirds by measuring the acoustic directionality of these calls in response to experimental presentations of a model predator. Acoustic directionality quantifies the radiation pattern of vocalizations and may provide evidence about the receiver of these calls. Overall, the birds produce antipredator calls that have a relatively low directionality, suggesting that the calls radiate in many directions to alert conspecifics. However, birds in some species increase the directionality of their calls when facing the predator. They can even direct their calls towards the predator when facing lateral to it—effectively vocalizing sideways towards the predator.

Birds adjust acoustic directionality to beam antipredator calls to predators and conspecifics

Yorzinski, J.L. & Patricelli, G.L. 2010. Birds adjust acoustic directionality to beam antipredator calls to predators and conspecifics. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B 277: 923-932.

Predator recognition in the absence of selection. In: Indonesian Primates, Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects (S. Gursky-Doyen and J. Supriatna, eds)

Yorzinski, J.L. 2010. Predator recognition in the absence of selection. In: Indonesian Primates, Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects (S. Gursky-Doyen and J. Supriatna, eds). Springer Press.

The effect of predator type and danger level on the mob calls of the American crow

Yorzinski, J.L. & Vehrencamp, S.L. 2009. The effect of predator type and danger level on the mob calls of the American crow. Condor 111: 159-168.